Writer's Life.org http://www.writerslife.org Where Writers Thrive Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:51:28 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=4.8.2 Weighing The Options For Self-Publishers http://www.writerslife.org/weighing-options-self-publishers/ http://www.writerslife.org/weighing-options-self-publishers/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:47:26 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=2143 There’s no doubt about it. We are living in golden age for writers, when self-publishing has become a realistic and respected route for writers to get their work into the hands of readers. But, as in most endeavors, the opportunities tend to come hand in hand with at least a few challenges thrown in as […]

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There’s no doubt about it.

We are living in golden age for writers, when self-publishing has become a realistic and respected route for writers to get their work into the hands of readers. But, as in most endeavors, the opportunities tend to come hand in hand with at least a few challenges thrown in as well.

For the self-publishing author, that means taking on a new and maybe daunting role that couldn’t be more different from the role of writer. All of a sudden, you need to transition from creative genius to pragmatic business person, and that’s not always an easy step to take.

That’s true enough for many writers even in the world of traditional, commercial publishing, when plots and characterization and word choice give way to contracts, production cycles, and self-promotion. It’s that much worse for self-publishers, who can feel lost at sea when they need to become instant experts in everything from book design to marketing to accounting and more.

The good news is that along with the emergence of the new technologies that make self-publishing both feasible and attractive there has been an explosion in resources to help with every step in the process. The bad news, if that’s what it is, is that the very wealth of choices can be overwhelming.

With a little discipline and planning, though, it really doesn’t have to be. Once you are familiar with all the options available for everything from editing to design and printing to marketing, you can apply a simple business principle to help you make the big decisions that lie ahead: ask yourself at every step not only how much it will cost, but also how many copies of the book you will need to sell to pay for it. Then you can make a reasoned business decision and stick to a realistic budget, just like a commercial publisher would.

Will a low-cost cover design do the work of selling your book, or does it make more sense to hire a top-shelf designer? Do you just need a copy edit to whip the book into shape, or should you be working with a seasoned development editor? The answer will be different for each author and each project, but looking for it through the eyes of a publisher can lead you to the right one.

Of course, it is tempting to pull out all the stops and spare no expense in turning your manuscript into a finished book, but that’s the author in you speaking. You the publisher will have a different idea. For that part of you, the book is a product for the marketplace and the numbers have to count.

The trick is to take off your writer’s hat and replace it with a bean-counter’s green eyeshade. As much as you love your book, as much as it’s become a part of you, as a publisher you have a different job to do and need a different perspective--if your goal is to get a return on your investment, in any case.

 

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Entering Contests–The “Evidence” Judges Want To See http://www.writerslife.org/entering-contests-evidence-judges-want-see/ http://www.writerslife.org/entering-contests-evidence-judges-want-see/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:47:12 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=2110 Think of it from the judge’s point of view. Her job, after all--like that of any good judge--is to weigh the evidence and render a verdict, in this case on the quality of the book, story, poem, or essay you’ve submitted to a writing contest. And her perspective is the one that will determine just […]

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Think of it from the judge’s point of view.

Her job, after all--like that of any good judge--is to weigh the evidence and render a verdict, in this case on the quality of the book, story, poem, or essay you’ve submitted to a writing contest.

And her perspective is the one that will determine just how your entry will fare.

On the one hand, you know going in that the odds are always stacked against a writer, in contests no less than in the publishing world. For every manuscript that wins an award, there are sure to be hundreds or thousands of competing works that don't make the cut.

But that’s no reason not to try. Contests can be an effective way to gain the visibility every writer wants and needs. And approaching those competitions strategically will go a long way toward boosting your chances of a win.

That’s where thinking like the judge makes all the difference. If you were faced with perhaps hundreds of entries and had only a few prizes to award, what evidence of excellence would you be looking for as you worked your way through the manuscripts?

Quite likely, Exhibit “A” would be the title itself.

But that’s an element a lot of writers tend to overlook. A good title does a great deal of work when it comes to drawing a judge in and hinting at what lies ahead. Who wouldn’t be intrigued by John Berendt’s Midnight In the Garden of Good and Evil or Terry McMillan’s How Stella Got Her Groove Back? For the judge, the thought, care, and creativity that go into the title can be persuasive evidence that an entry is going to maintain the same qualities all the way through and command serious consideration.

Then comes Exhibit "B"--the body of the work itself.

Every writer has heard it before, but it is essential to remember that you only have a page, a paragraph, or perhaps a line or two of a poem to make an irresistible first impression. Don’t get off on the wrong foot. It may sound harsh, but the flip side of selecting a winner from, say, 500 entries is eliminating 499 of them. Don't give the judge a reason to pass yours by.

At the most basic level, make sure your entry is free of typos or other errors that signal a lack of care. Beyond that, take a long, hard look at it through the judge’s eyes to make sure that every sentence, every word, pulls the reader deeper into the story and nearer to the conclusion.

Once you have done that and made sure your manuscript is award-worthy, there are still other steps you can take to improve your odds--and pitfalls that are more common than you might think.

If the contest is divided into categories, be careful to pick the most appropriate one. That might seem obvious, but a lot of writers stumble when confronted with the choices.

If you know who the judge will be, think about her own work and try to submit a piece you think will resonate with her.

Follow the guidelines! This is not the place to push the envelope, and some judges say it’s the first thing they look for. If the guidelines say 1,000-word limit, they mean 1,000 words, not 1,100.

Then--before you drop it in the mailbox or push “send”--take one more careful look at your entry, from that judge’s point of view and make a final pass at editing. There’s always something that can be improved.

Of course, even the most careful review doesn’t guarantee success in the fiercely competitive world of writing contests. But even if you don’t come out on top of the contest, your manuscript will be tighter, more polished, and better than ever--and that’s a prize in and of itself.

 

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Be Romantic: Use An Exotic Locale in Books http://www.writerslife.org/romantic-use-exotic-locale-books/ http://www.writerslife.org/romantic-use-exotic-locale-books/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:43:26 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=4398 We all love to travel. Books help us get to distant locations and experience worlds that we may never have an opportunity to see in real life. Some of these worlds are too far away. Others come alive solely in the imagination of the writer. Have you ever read a story that doesn’t offer you […]

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We all love to travel. Books help us get to distant locations and experience worlds that we may never have an opportunity to see in real life. Some of these worlds are too far away. Others come alive solely in the imagination of the writer.

Have you ever read a story that doesn’t offer you anything in terms of locale and settings? If you have, chances are that you don’t want to go back. Experts have found out that fiction readers want a couple of things –an escape from reality, laughs, an intellectual challenge and a surprise among few hours.

An exotic locale can address several of these needs. The concept may sound a bit ambiguous at first but it’s easy to define.

What is an Exotic Locale?

The thrills of travel – this is what an exotic locale is all about. People are explorers deep in their hearts. This is probably one of the most important reasons why we devour quality books. They give us an opportunity to indulge in the experience. To discover a distant world that’s so exotic and different from everything we get to go through on a daily basis.

Exotic settings or an exotic locale refers to a distant country or a non-existent exotic place where the action is taking place. Hogwarts in Harry Potter is an exotic locale. Dan Brown’s Inferno and The Martian are other books featuring an exotic locale.

Exotic locale writing is far from easy. It involves more than describing the place. Cultural references, language and climate specifics will have to be taken into consideration to paint a comprehensive picture. Any hole you leave will immediately ruin the consistency and kill the magic.

Getting Started with Exotic Locale Writing

What’s the key to a great exotic locale? You’ll have to do the one essential that will be determining for every other aspect of writing – research. If you’re writing about a real location, you should either have intimate knowledge about it (a country that you visited, for example) or you should do sufficient reading to make the settings authentic. Readers need details in order to be transported to a location. If you can’t provide those, you should probably stick to something less exotic and a bit more familiar.

Exotic locale writing has a number of key specifics. The most important things to do and rules to follow include:

  • Consult a wide array of sources: sure, online searches, even online prof writers are easy and they give you access to tons of information. Travel books and even documentaries, however, will enable you to “see” the place. Take some time to watch a couple of travel films, even movies that are set in the specific place. Getting inspired by fiction is a wonderful idea. One thing to be careful about however, is not getting influenced by the original style.
  • Forget about your assumptions and cultural biases: these will immediately be evident in your writing. Start with a blank screen, both literally and metaphorically. Open your mind. You may even want to interact with people from the respective place. Online communities, discussions groups and forums give you such an opportunity.
  • Use a map: whether your book is set in a fantasy or a real exotic location, a map will benefit you and it will also give readers valuable information. This is a great starting point. It can help you make plot decisions, as well.
  • Know the history of the place: or come up with a history for an imaginary exotic locale. The history has a major impact on the appearance, the architecture, the nature and the cities/settlements. History and background will give the settings a few layers, making the exotic locale deeper and more meaningful. By having a good idea about the history of the place, you’ll also get to effortlessly tie the locale with the plot.
  • How will your characters interact with the locale: the place will affect your characters and their actions. This is something to think about in advance if you want consistency in the story.
  • Think about your audience: this is the final and probably the most important thing to do. A place that’s incredibly exotic to you may not necessarily be exotic to your readers. Every person will respond to a locale in a unique way. If you’re writing for an international audience, you’ll find it very difficult to present the place as exotic to just about everyone going through the pages.

 Exotic Locale with a Purpose

As writers, we’re tempted to make things unusual, unexpected and fresh. Exotic locale writing provides such opportunities. Before you start thinking about the most exotic place on earth (or in outer space), however, you should have a clear idea about how the settings are going to impact your story.

Exotic locale for the sake of exotic locale isn’t going to accomplish a lot. It has to be meaningful. It has to add to the story. An exotic locale, for example, could provide a nice contrast to the protagonist’s familiar home (hence, a conflict could arise). Have a clear plan right from the start and understand the impact of the settings. That’s the only way to craft a compelling story that people will enjoy rather than question.

 

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Writer http://www.writerslife.org/writer/ http://www.writerslife.org/writer/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:42:53 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=5008 I guess when your a writer, you feel everything ten to power of hundred in order to compose it in words, you feel each and every emotion either its pain, agony, happiness, hollowness, loneliness, peace and above all the master of all emotions; that emotion which is capable of taking over all emotions; that's even […]

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I guess when your a writer, you feel everything ten to power of hundred in order to compose it in words, you feel each and every emotion either its pain, agony, happiness, hollowness, loneliness, peace and above all the master of all emotions; that emotion which is capable of taking over all emotions; that's even maybe sometimes the cause of all these emotions; that cunning yet oh so innocent and pure emotion love, so that any soul who read it even after decades, centuries can relate to it. That is when you are a great creator of words.

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Writing For Children http://www.writerslife.org/writing-for-children/ http://www.writerslife.org/writing-for-children/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:42:18 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=5201 Herman was a very friendly frog ... Writing for children can be fun once you've been a parent and realize how much they treasure early memories and favorite stories. Remembering your favorite toys, books, stuffed animals, places, surroundings and neighbors would be the first place to recall life's most inspiring events from our childhood years. […]

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Herman was a very friendly frog ...

Writing for children can be fun once you've been a parent and realize how much they treasure early memories and favorite stories. Remembering your favorite toys, books, stuffed animals, places, surroundings and neighbors would be the first place to recall life's most inspiring events from our childhood years. Add to that, all that you've witnessed first hand in your beginning family, and you can see your window of opportunity for inspiring a child amounts to a few precious years that form an entire future.

First think of the age you want to write for. For baby, mostly simple pictures next to one word on indestructible formats using big or fat lettering. For the two-year-old, several words and more detailed pictures. For three to four years old, you'll want to use a very brief, clear sentence structure that brings out the content of a visual with vivid descriptive language. When the child is five or six years old, they're ready for Kindergarten or First Grade, and may be happy with fewer pictures or photographs of nature and art that fascinate our imagination in greater detail.

Let the child know that their artwork is highly valuable and memorable to the grown-up world of books. Trying to outshine a child's skill may get them to Disney World in their heart, but there was only one Walt Disney, and life doesn't need to be all about competition. Fun happens with sentimental things we can all accomplish. Fun is participating.

Let's think of an example in the area of content for a toddler's book:

Page 1  Clouds are cool.

Page 2  Look at the shapes.

Page 3  What do you see?

Page 4  I see a sheep.

Page 5  What do you see?

Page 6  I see a boat.

etc.

Now let's think about the child nearing Kindergarten.

The Paper Turkey

Page 1  (artwork) Children's Thanksgiving Turkey from construction paper

Page 2  "Every Thanksgiving, we eat turkey, but the most fun is making one."

Page 3  (artwork) Boy or girl (or both) with their scissors and construction paper cutting shapes at a small table

Page 4  "Be careful with the scissors!"

Page 5  (artwork) A picture of supplies -- glue, string, warm, fall colors for paper, plastic eyes or buttons .. etc.

Page 6  "You have to have the right colors to make a good turkey."

etc.

Suddenly, you feel ready to take this on like a sock puppet, and write your first or fifth children's book, but who will love it? Who will make the art? Go to the school and ask whether they want to contribute in any way. You MAY even be a local artist with grassroots supplies. Good luck!

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NO BETTER TIME THAN NOW http://www.writerslife.org/no-better-time-now/ http://www.writerslife.org/no-better-time-now/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:42:01 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=5410 The devil only submits to those who work faith and not those who only talk faith. You don’t wait for your ship to come to you, rather you swim to meet your ship. Start shaping your own day now

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NO BETTER TIME THAN NOW

*In-Him-Justified* Devotional!
MONDAY 14TH AUGUST, 2017
FOCUS: NO BETTER TIME THAN NOW
TEXT: EPH 5:16 REDEEMING THE TIME, BECAUSE THE DAYS ARE EVIL

One of the biggest weapons of the devil is the phrase “all things being equal”. Let me ask, can your five fingers ever be equal? If the best time to take that step you have always dreamt of is tomorrow then that time may never come because there will always be a tomorrow. If your reason for waiting is because of the global economic recession then you may have to wait longer because, all things can never be equal in this life.

A man and his friend were on a voyage, then came turbulent storms and mighty waves. He asked his friend “what should we do, should we keep going or stop and pray” the friend answered and said “let’s row and pray” and that was how they eventually safe-landed. Must people have become victims of stop-and-pray? The Bible speaking in James 2: 14 says “What does it profit, my brethren, if someone says he has faith but does not have works? Can faith save him? (NKJV) No, because faith alone without work makes one irresponsibly lazy.

It is evident that the devil is out to ensure that no positive dream and vision conceived sees the light of day by raising unprecedented adversaries (1Cor16:9) Yet waiting for a better day to do anything equals surrendering to the devil which is highly unscriptural. Redeeming the time because the days are evil (EPH 5 :16) I.e. the evil of this day that could not stop you waking up this morning cannot also stop you from achieving whatever you’ve set your faith to launch onto.

This is the victory that overcomes the world even our faith…1John5:4. Already you have victory now get up, work and walk as one who has got victory and don’t just seat there and profess your faith. The devil only submits to those who work faith and not those who only talk faith. You don’t wait for your ship to come to you, rather you swim to meet your ship. Start shaping your own day now.

If two people were given a plot of land to cultivate, one is an unbeliever while the other a believer. The unbeliever goes ahead to do his planting appropriately while the believer only ended up going to the land to make faith declarations every morning without planting. Who will eventually experience a
Bumper harvest? Christianity should not make anybody lazy. The world is expecting our testimonies and not our stories. May God grant us a deeper understanding of His word in Jesus name.

Take this last word: ANY FAITH THAT MAKES GOD ABSOLUTELY RESPONSIBLE FOR YOUR EVERYTHING IS AN IRRESPONSIBLE FAITH!

Have a most rewarding day, In Jesus matchless name!
#In-Him-Justified*devotional!

Felix Uzoma Okereafor
#RaisingacompletemaninHim

 

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Characters http://www.writerslife.org/characters/ http://www.writerslife.org/characters/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:38:32 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=5420 I am only a woman. I learned to write from Henry David Thoreau, William Shakespeare, Ralph Waldo Emerson, William Wordsworth, Keats, Shelby, Byron, Browning, General George Washington and other Founding Fathers; but, Jane Austen inspired men to make Motion Picture masterpieces based upon her wonderful characters, and I watched them along with many other movies, […]

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I am only a woman. I learned to write from Henry David Thoreau, William Shakespeare, Ralph Waldo Emerson, William Wordsworth, Keats, Shelby, Byron, Browning, General George Washington and other Founding Fathers; but, Jane Austen inspired men to make Motion Picture masterpieces based upon her wonderful characters, and I watched them along with many other movies, classic and otherwise, allowing all of the visuals and interpretations of creative thought to inundate my mind and heart over the years, all inspired by writing indeed, yet filtered through countless acts of appreciation as well.

I remember feeling a bit strange after I matured that I was mimicking the behavior of men in writing poetry; nevertheless, we were expected to gain an education and to use it, whereas women hadn't before the Industrial Revolution, the invention of the automobile in particular. Without ease in transportation, women don't stand up to the deeds of men. They dress well to have a good address, they exhibit good manners to live in a nice manor, they submit to gentlemen to be considered gentile.

Consider the modern man and woman within the confines of machinery, and you have only about a century of evolutionary growth toward likeness in character. I've found men easily put off by us and without hope that we may have something special to offer should it not appear immediately in physical appearance and finances. Writing only romantic fantasies is a tempting concept, but to study the human condition, and to write individual characters with regard to all we see and appreciate in life, as students of expression and communicative endeavor, to form contrast and opinion is to create social understanding.

To me, humor is to say 'Jim Carrey Gold's Gym.'

OR

to see Jim Carrey impersonating Latka ..

Precious gemstones in entertainment history are derived from great thinkers, whether they became play wrights, novelists, poets or philosophers. The thinkers themselves are characters. We love mentioning Albert Einstein. Who is the most famous actress in Motion Picture film history? Who did God create first, and why do you think of a comedian now? The human sense of humor is actually necessary to overcome great evil.

The Holy Bible, the book of JOSHUA before JUDGES. (KJV) Chapter 1 [1] Now after the death of Moses the servant of the LORD it came to pass, that the LORD spake unto Joshua the son of Nun, Moses' minister, saying, [2] Moses my servant is dead; now therefore arise, go over this Jordan, thou, and all this people, unto the land which I do give to them, even to the children of Israel.

Jesus, Mary and Joking son of none. Laughter is a response to surprise.

From The Divine Comedy by Dante Alighieri  -- “The day that man allows true love to appear, those things which are well made will fall into confusion and will overturn everything we believe to be right and true.” 

Falling in love doesn't happen because someone makes you proud in the public eye. Pride before the fall happens. Everything in life that you've pursued has been in order to better yourself and to make you feel accomplished, pleasing the expectations of others, and of those who guided you, until someone truly special appears who cannot be forgotten, but who effects you in a permanent way due to their irreplaceable substance, their character.

Whether serious or comic or in contrast toward one another, every unique person in our world has the effect of making us feel better about ourselves somehow, in that we sense a kind of a mirror in our thoughts that appears so subtly, we seldom consider it. Appreciate differences and you enjoy who you are.

 

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The Writer’s Heart http://www.writerslife.org/the-writers-heart/ http://www.writerslife.org/the-writers-heart/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:38:06 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=5866 A true writer writes with his heart.

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Nowadays, there are many "so-called" famous young writers. They are product of either a Writing Competition or the Wattpad. But really, are they that good? Or they are just using their influence to gain readers? And the worst? It's by creating numerous accounts just to create publicity or gain reads in their works.

 

In a generation where stories has gotten cliched or copying (knowingly or unknowingly) other's plot has been in almost every stories, one cannot know whether it's still worth it or not.

 

In an ocean of great books, famous writers and recycled storylines, how can a mere amateur writer make it to the top? Next to J.K Rowling, Stephen King, Mark Twain, Ernest Hemingway and so forth. Yes, I heard you. It's through gimmick!

 

GIMMICK
I will tell you straight to your face dear, gimmick is a lame but easiest way to be known. Its success rate depends on two things. First, the gravity of your gimmickry. Some gimmicks of these young writers ranges from wearing a mask, to wearing an all black, to wearing an eyeglass, to more absurd if not bizarre costumes and the lists goes on. Who cares if the story isn't even worth it, if you can pull off that gimmick! Right?

 

Second, it also depends on your readers. Yes dear, to make that gimmick successful, you must have a huge following. Take note that it is crucial for an amateur writer to be friendly and polite to gain readers. Especially the teens, they are mostly your readers. You must always interact with them even with a simple "Hi" or click that "Like" button if you can't accomodate them. Because if you didn't, they might think that you are a snob. That for some, it might affect their interest and eventually you will lost a follower.

 

But you see, above all these gimmicks that they are coming up, they have forgotten the essence of writing a story. A great story reflects the heart of the author. You as a writer, is giving away your personality, time and thoughts to your work. Sadly, the world isn't fair- so is writing. Readers and writers nowadays are only looking for that "romantic excitement". They lost that depth in what they write or do. They lost that creative imagination to a point that everything is- shallow.


WRITING ABILITY

Gimmick or not, a true writer should still have that heart in his craft. Your writing ability is what matters. Regardless if you don't have that number of reads your story deserves. Because a great story will be remembered if not now, maybe sometime in the future. Imagine yourself as a famous writer, with a great plot and a simple gimmick to compliment? You can never go wrong! And for that, you deserved my applause.

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Things Your Freelance Writer Should Know http://www.writerslife.org/things-freelance-writer-know/ http://www.writerslife.org/things-freelance-writer-know/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:37:46 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=5902 They will need a reminder of what's in the style guide occasionally, try memorizing 15 pages of rules.

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Finding a freelance writer is easy, finding one you like, not so much. When you finally find one that you like, be very clear about these things. Even if ‘but they’re in the style guide”.
  1. Word Count
Word count, the most essential, basic, the first thing your freelance writer should know. It’s at the bottom of most submission pages, or explicitly stated. It is the number the writer will go by.
But what if it’s not, or hasn’t been updated? Don’t say 300 words when you mean, 400, you mean, 500, 500-700, but you can go over- be extremely clear. It is very important information, and not your writer’s fault if you fail to update it, or be clear.
2. Topics
Topics or word count, depending on the writer, one of the first things they ask about. What do you cover? What would you cover, any subtopics? Whatever you want them to write about, don’t be shy, be direct. It also makes hiring the writer, or the writer, accepting the job, much easier.
3. Audience
Who is the audience? This is an essential, must know or else. Along with knowing what to write about it, your writer needs to know how to write about it to appeal to your audience.
Writing for teenagers is very different from writing for retirees. Writing for a print audience is very different from writing for an online audience. The success of your content depends on your writer knowing this information.
4. Tone
Some topics are less serious, less technical than others. But not everyone agrees hoe much less serious and technical. It’s hard to make an article about “How to Make Friends” very scientific without sounding off putting.
Some writers might remove all technicality, be more casual. Some might be more scientific, logos driven. Dictate what direction your content goes in, and give specific examples and editing notes. If you want more technicality, say so. A good writer will be able to adapt and edit.
5. How Much Freedom They Have
Don’t say someone can be funny, and then when they’re funny, tell them their work is crap. If you let some people be funny, have a little more freedom, you have to let everyone have that freedom.
What language can they use, can they write in their own voice, can they make bold, personal statements? Be painfully clear about this. Some will get offended, but it’s better than your unbacked, unexplained and super emotional offense that makes your writers quit on you.
6. Due By
When should they get their articles in for editing? Yes, this can get overlooked, ignored. You can’t just edit it whenever it comes in, and publish it. You have a schedule, everyone is much happier with a schedule. Everyone, including you, the editor, is held accountable.
Editing takes time, and sometimes it’s not the writer’s fault that the deadline is missed.
7. Deadline
When will the edited final product be published? Where does an article fit in the schedule? You, your readers, and content creators should know this information. And it should be available to everyone on your team.
If the Due Date is unclear, then the deadline, published by, date is a good way to guesstimate it. Having a clear, obvious, deadline is better though. It also helps keep everyone accountable, and your readers reading.
8. Who’s the (Actual) Editor
Managing Editor, Editor in Chief, Editor- all different titles, with different functions. Managing editors are on the ground floor, and manage the editing, and scheduling. They are assisted by the editors they manage, or the writers. The Editor in Chief is above, and manages all them, and does less editing day to day.
Writers can edit their own articles, just be consistent and clear that they are supposed to. Or make sure they know who their editor, or editors are.
If you’re getting five different reactions to a piece you’ve submitted five times. There’s a game of hot potato going on, and guess what the potato is. It is better for a writer to have one, or two, consistent editors. Whatever their editing titles are.
9. Other Media
Do writers need to provide pictures, video? That’s manageable for most nowadays. What size, how long? What kind would you like? Do you have some they have to include, or you’d like to be included? Be very specific about this, oppress them a little. Make sure everything makes sense, comes together.
And provide tutorials, resources for them if this is the case. Writers are used to attempting to keep up with the times. Old writers can learn new tricks.
10. New Directions
When you have a revelation, new idea, policy, or general change in direction- tell everyone. It’s not the writers, or editors, fault when they submit work that’s not up to the new par. And you don’t publish it, for to them, no apparent reason.
If you pull something like that, there are other people and publications they could write for. That are much better communicators. And will listen when they ask why the technology magazine has a new food section, and why.
Your underlings have very good points sometimes, give them a chance, lend them your ear.
Being the boss isn’t always fun, but as long as you keep everyone informed, answer their questions, and don’t blame any publishing, editing issues on them. And treat them fairly, they won’t quit on you.
They will need a reminder of what’s in the style guide occasionally, instead of having an attitude, try memorizing 15 pages of rules and checking every sentence for every rule, on a deadline. You’ll realize that you’re probably not surrounded by idiots.

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Detecting Sarcasm http://www.writerslife.org/detecting-sarcasm/ http://www.writerslife.org/detecting-sarcasm/#respond Wed, 18 Oct 2017 11:35:03 +0000 http://www.writerslife.org/?p=6023 Beep, beep, beep, if there was a magical sarcasm detector, yeah, that would be great. But alas there isn’t. However, you can still sense its presence. Of course, this is easier when speaking, but writing not so much. It’s possible though, here are some very strong indicators. Humor is Clearly Used If humor is already […]

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Beep, beep, beep, if there was a magical sarcasm detector, yeah, that would be great. But alas there isn’t. However, you can still sense its presence. Of course, this is easier when speaking, but writing not so much. It’s possible though, here are some very strong indicators.

Humor is Clearly Used

If humor is already in use, there’s an increased chance that whatever offends you is not meant to be taken seriously, or meant at all. Sarcasm is a form of parody, hyperbole, it’s often dry, or hyperbolic delivery is meant to highlight ridiculousness.

Other kinds of humor accompanying it, highlights it even more, makes it sound more surreal. You will never see sarcasm by itself, or as the only tool used to achieve this.Sarcasm is actually very grounded, provides balance. That interrupts the giggle fits, makes you stop and think.

What are You Reading?

Term Papers and an article in “The Onion” are two very different things, they don’t sound alike at all. Because they’re not supposed to. They communicate their points, and seriousness, in their own ways.

If a document is intrinsically more serious, structured, dry, and not fun to read- there won’t be a lot of sarcasm. But an article on “Yes I am Judging You”, www.ehadams.wordpress.com, is intrinsically serious, but not. It has a different feel, and different elements, style. It will be sarcastic and humorous. More fun to read, so expect to hopefully giggle a little.

Tone

You cannot overlook tone in writing. You don’t have to read it out loud, but you get the mood, intention, of a piece from reading it, and hints like the topic, other writing elements.

If the tone is less serious, expect humor and sarcasm. If it’s serious, don’t not expect it, but expect it less. “I’m a monkey’s uncle”, is a serious statement in an autobiography written by a hyper-intelligent monkey, who is an uncle. And the hard road it had in life, being accepted by human society, with stories of loss, hope, friendship, and how life is bananas but beautiful.

“I’m a monkey’s uncle” used by Scar in “The Lion King”, is not meant to be taken seriously. It was a joke, his only joke in the entire movie. Simba was also clearly a lion, not a monkey. Scar was being sarcastic, and only equating Simba with a monkey because of his shenanigans.

Sarcasm is meant to be taken, but not literally.

Jews Caused the Civil War

Oh my, they did? What a- this statement seems out of place, shocking, why is….like Scar’s only joke in “The Lion King”. Sarcasm is disjarring and out of place in it’s essence. It’s shocking, it makes a point, makes you think, then laugh.

Some things are also just so categorically untrue, and people who know this will say them, but not mean them. It’s their way of mocking it. As Scar was mocking Simba in “The Lion King”, me saying “Jews Caused the Civil War”, is mocking that person on Twitter who actually sent me that link to that website.

Language

Language is key, they don’t just have denotations, they have connotations. They carry certain meanings, history. If words humorous, or not that serious or academic in nature are being used, that’s a sign.

Not to say that big, scary looking words can’t be used not seriously, but it’s just extra work for the writer and reader. It takes a very special, specific audience to warrant that extra work.

For example, “As a Christian, I am cool with schmersmorchman.” Obviously, duh, everyone knows what schmersmorchman is.

But “As a Catholic, I am against antidisestablishmenterrianism”, the heck? It takes work, and the more work it takes, the faster the humor flies away. Although if you get it, it’s kind of funny, and pretty darn sarcastic.

Sarcasm is hard to pull off in writing, successfully, and even harder to detect. But it can be done, and there are signs. You just have to know what you’re looking for, and not be offended by everything you don’t immediately get.

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